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Global Outlook on walking and Cycling Global Outlook on walking and Cycling

Global Outlook on Walking and Cycling: Policies and Realities around the world

Publication Type:

Report

Source:

UN Environment, Nairobi, Kenya (2016)

URL:

http://www.unep.org/Transport/SharetheRoad

Abstract:

Transport has hard hitting consequences for almost every aspect of the life for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. For example, it generates nearly a quarter of all carbon dioxide emissions and is the fastest growing contributor of greenhouse gasses. It also feeds air pollution that is killing seven million
people a year and increasing health problems like bronchitis, asthma, heart disease and brain damage. However, we can reverse those trends and make rapid progress towards ending poverty, healing our planet and making it secure by 2030. For example, many Kenyan children can’t get to school because
they live so far away. With some 500 pedestrians dying in Nairobi each year, it’s easy to see why parents are unwilling to risk their child’s life. Many of the children who do walk arrive late or tired, especially girls who must also find time and energy for housework. The Kenyan Government, World Bicycle Relief and World Vision are changing this by helping local communities distribute and maintain bikes for students. Newly trained mechanics have jobs; students arrive on time and ready to learn; and their families more easily transport water to their homes, goods to market and sick people to health facilities. Scaling up that kind of change starts by deciding to take the first step, which can be as simple as creating
a cycling and walking policy.

This report looks at ideas from around the world, including the policies for decision makers and the realities for citizens, to show what really works.
As the population heads towards nine billion, we need to design mobility for our people instead of mobility for our cars. This report will inspire decision makers from across the public and private sector to explore where they live and work on foot and on two wheels, assess their commitments and adopt more
of the great ideas from this collection.

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Document Category: Report, Urban Transport

Transport has hard hitting consequences for almost every aspect of the life for drivers, cyclists and pedestrians. For example, it generates nearly a quarter of all carbon dioxide emissions and is the fastest growing contributor of greenhouse gasses. It also feeds air pollution that is killing seven million
people a year and increasing health problems like bronchitis, asthma, heart disease and brain damage. However, we can reverse those trends and make rapid progress towards ending poverty, healing our planet and making it secure by 2030. For example, many Kenyan children can’t get to school because
they live so far away. With some 500 pedestrians dying in Nairobi each year, it’s easy to see why parents are unwilling to risk their child’s life. Many of the children who do walk arrive late or tired, especially girls who must also find time and energy for housework. The Kenyan Government, World Bicycle Relief and World Vision are changing this by helping local communities distribute and maintain bikes for students. Newly trained mechanics have jobs; students arrive on time and ready to learn; and their families more easily transport water to their homes, goods to market and sick people to health facilities. Scaling up that kind of change starts by deciding to take the first step, which can be as simple as creating
a cycling and walking policy.

This report looks at ideas from around the world, including the policies for decision makers and the realities for citizens, to show what really works.
As the population heads towards nine billion, we need to design mobility for our people instead of mobility for our cars. This report will inspire decision makers from across the public and private sector to explore where they live and work on foot and on two wheels, assess their commitments and adopt more
of the great ideas from this collection.