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Urban Solid Waste Management Urban Solid Waste Management

Urban Solid Waste Management

Publication Type:

Report

Authors:

Source:

Compendium of Global Good Practices, National Institute of Urban Affairs, New Delhi (2015)

URL:

http://pearl.niua.org/sites/default/files/books/GP-GL3_SWM.pdf

Abstract:

This documentation targets the limitations and challenges of contemporary solid waste management mechanisms in developing contexts, namely:
1. Low financial resources at municipal level for waste management and technological research;
2. Improper disposal of waste leading to extensive landfilling, littering in public places and choking of public infrastructure (drains, paths, gardens etc.);
3. Air, water and soil pollution due to release of GHG’s & foul smelling gases, stagnation of water bodies and leaching from landfills etc.;
4. Lack of a waste management culture and awareness amongst citizens.
5. Under-recognition of the role of the informal sector in waste management. The role of waste related activities in the marginalization of certain sections of society.
By studying a number of waste management initiatives in cities across the world, this document serves as a directory of relevant waste management solutions that aim at the reduction of waste generated; recycling/reuse/recovery of waste at all levels of handling – from home to landfill; better handling of residual waste particularly with the integration of modern technology;
ecologically sound and socially just waste management.
Document Category: Compendium, Good Practices

This documentation targets the limitations and challenges of contemporary solid waste management mechanisms in developing contexts, namely:

1. Low financial resources at municipal level for waste management and technological research;

2. Improper disposal of waste leading to extensive landfilling, littering in public places and choking of public infrastructure (drains, paths, gardens etc.);

3. Air, water and soil pollution due to release of GHG’s & foul smelling gases, stagnation of water bodies and leaching from landfills etc.;

4. Lack of a waste management culture and awareness amongst citizens.

5. Under-recognition of the role of the informal sector in waste management. The role of waste related activities in the marginalization of certain sections of society.

By studying a number of waste management initiatives in cities across the world, this document serves as a directory of relevant waste management solutions that aim at the reduction of waste generated; recycling/reuse/recovery of waste at all levels of handling – from home to landfill; better handling of residual waste particularly with the integration of modern technology;

ecologically sound and socially just waste management.